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Officials fight spread of Chronic Wasting Disease

Officials fight spread of Chronic Wasting Disease

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) -- Last month, The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission confirmed an elk was the first case of Chronic Wasting Disease in the natural state. Since then, two deer have also tested positive for the deadly disease.

While the disease can’t be contracted to humans, it is still something Arkansans should take seriously.

Lake Catherine State Park hosting Bald Eagle Bonanza Weekend

Lake Catherine State Park hosting Bald Eagle Bonanza Weekend

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. (LCSP) - If your spine tingles at the sight of an eagle soaring majestically, then you’re aware of the unique combination of beauty and efficient design that sets these birds apart from other winged creatures. While soaring at 500ft, it can spot a fish from a mile away, and then swoop down to it at 100 miles per hour. Don’t think it’s necessary to travel to far-off places to see an eagle in the wild. Arkansas is a favorite wintering ground for bald eagles, and they are seen in nearly every part of the Natural State.

Lake Catherine State Park celebrates their arrival with the Bald Eagle Bonanza Event. This will be your chance to get out and see eagles, various other birds of prey, and migratory birds in the wild as expert Rangers, Naturalists, and Park Interpreters take you within viewing distance. Other common sightings on the tours include ospreys, waterfowl, herons, loons, owls, and other winter wildlife. 

Bass Lupus Awareness Tournament

Bass Lupus Awareness Tournament

Benefit for the Lupus Foundation of America, Arkansas Chapter to be held on Saturday, March 23, 2013 at Lake Ouachita Crystal Springs Boat Ramp in Hot Springs. 

Time is "safe sunlight" to 3 p.m.  $100.00 per boat.  Contact:  Travis Harley at 501-392-2407 or 800-294-8878. 

All net proceeds received will be donated to the Lupus Foundation of America, Arkansas Chapter.

The Theba Thing: Biking Bliss

The Theba Thing: Biking Bliss

"The Theba Thing" is about stepping out of my comfort zone, meeting new people and trying the things that have been on my mind and heart.

In the fall of 2011, I was bitten by the bike-riding bug. I went biking at Two Rivers Park with my brother and his family visiting from Fayetteville. I knew I was going to “have to” go, because they’re big into outdoor activities.  So I rode one of their extra bikes and I absolutely had the time of my life.

I had no idea these wonderful scenic trails existed so close to where I lived. I sure have been living in a comfortable bubble, which usually means to me, where there are no bugs, no potential for bumps and scratches and plenty of air conditioning.

Nevertheless, I was hooked. I started planning how both my mother and I could enjoy bike riding together, and get my friends in on the action as well.  But first I had to convince mom that she would enjoy it as much as I did.

Spiders can scare throughout winter

Spiders can scare throughout winter

Spiders are associated with Halloween, but the arachnids will most likely be seen throughout the winter in homes due to the warm summer we experienced. Often popping up after people bring holiday decorations or winter clothing out of storage, Terminix, the nation’s largest pest control company, has a few tips for prevention and protection to limit number of infestations and incidents of bites.

Why do spiders invade homes?

Like most pests, spiders are opportunistic and invade homes out of convenience. Human structures often provide a sheltered environment and can provide easy access to other insects. 

How do spiders get into homes?

Spiders can slip through very small exterior openings.

Record number of deer hunting permits available Oct. 11

Record number of deer hunting permits available Oct. 11

If you didn’t draw a deer permit for an Arkansas Game and Fish Commission wildlife management area hunt this year, there’s still a good chance to get the one you’re after. More than 6,000 unclaimed permits will be available beginning 8 a.m., Oct. 11, at the AGFC Little Rock headquarters and regional offices across the state.

“Typically, we have about 3,000 leftovers available,” said Ashley Bean, AGFC permit program coordinator. “This year, we had almost the same number of applicants, but they were focused only on a few hunts, leaving many unclaimed permits throughout the state.”

Some permits are even available for some of Arkansas’s most coveted wildlife management areas. There’s even permit available for the modern gun hunt at Freddie Black Choctaw Island Deer Research Area WMA, which normally takes about four years to draw. These high-demand permits are left because people who had enough preference points drew the permit, but did not pay.